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Browsing: Jina images (Add. 26519)

Image: Worship of Śānti

Title: Worship of Śānti

Source:
The British Library Board
Shelfmark:
Add. 26519
Author:
unknown
Date of creation:
possibly 18th century
Folio number:
104 recto
Total number of folios:
not applicable
Place of creation:
western India
Language:
Gujarati
Medium:
opaque watercolour on paper
Size:
14 x 8 cms
Copyright:
CC0 1.0 (Creative Commons Public Domain)
Image copyright: Creative Commons Public Domain

Description

A large cream-coloured figure sits on a throne in a multi-domed temple structure, two flags flying from two of the domes. Sitting in the lotus posture of meditation, he wears an intricate headdress and jewellery. There are lamps on his left and right while above his head is a kind of double-ended lotus stalk, which is an ornament and probable symbol of purity.

He is flanked by a male figure on the left and a female figure on the right, each standing under a bell. The man has hands folded in a gesture of homage and respect.

Below are three men talking to each other. On each side of them are flights of steps, indicating they are outside the temple. This outdoor scene also shows the sky and trees behind the domes.

Thus this lively painting features two scenes in one, namely the:

  • interior of a temple
  • landscape surrounding the temple, depicted through the sky and trees.

Inside the main cella of the temple a Jina is enthroned, and being worshipped. This Jina cannot be identified for sure, in the absence of any identifying emblem. His identification as Śāntinātha or Lord Śānti, the 16th Jina, cannot be more than a guess. The throne is where the emblem is usually found but here it is only decorated.

The figures on the Jina's left and right sides are lay devotees worshipping him. It is the custom in India that men gather on one side of the temple and women on the other. The small bells above them are used in ceremonies of worship, when devotees strike them with their hands.

The costumes of the three men below suggest that they are wealthy men in society, probably businessmen. They meet and talk before entering the temple.

The painter does not use perspective, but does represent the journey through the landscape to the temple and then inside. The temple court, where the men are, is presented first, followed by the interior of the temple.

Other visual elements

This is a full-page painting. The elaborate floral border of the picture underscores the decorative nature of the image.

Background

This manuscript has the format of a European book and is a composite document with different items.

The 24 Jinas are always represented in a very stylised way in visual art. In some cases, however, the colour of their body is an identifying mark – green for Pārśva, blue for Nemi, for instance.

Apart from this the Jinas have no obvious identifying marks with the exception of the 23rd Jina, Pārśvanātha or Lord Pārśva. Pārśva is usually shown with a snake headdress, which highlights his close association with snakes – nāga. No other Jinas have a life story featuring an animal in this way.

Moreover, each Jina has an emblem that is frequently included in artwork so he can be identified.

In this album, which has five pictures, two Jinas can be definitely named:

  • the 22nd Jina Neminātha or Lord Nemi
  • the 23rd Jina Pārśva.

The identity of the other three is uncertain. They may be the other most popular Jinas:

  • the first Jina Ṛṣabhanātha or Lord Ṛṣabha, who is also known as Ādinātha – 'First Lord'
  • the 16th Jina Śāntinātha or Lord Śānti
  • the 24th Jina Mahāvīra.

A Jina is always shown in meditation, either standing or sitting, like here. Among the Śvetāmbaras, the Jina is thought of as a spiritual king and is often depicted with ornaments and seated on a throne. This is the case here.

Glossary

Dhyāna
Sanskrit for 'meditation', one of the six internal austerities or tapas that help purify the soul of karma. Meditation is deep thought about religious doctrine or mental focus on spiritual matters over a period of time. An important part of many religions, meditation is especially important in Jain belief because it forms key elements of religious practice and spiritual development.
Jina
A 'victor' in Sanskrit, a Jina is an enlightened human being who has triumphed over karma and teaches the way to achieve liberation . A synonym for Tīrthaṃkara, which means 'ford-maker' or one who has founded a community after reaching omniscience through asceticism. The most famous 24 – Ṛṣabha to Mahāvīra – were born in the Bharata-kṣetra of the middle world , but more are found in other continents. There have been Jinas in the past and there will be some in the future.
Pūjā
Sanskrit for 'worship' or 'homage'. All Jains perform rites of honour to the 24 Jinas. Rites of worship take place daily, with more elaborate ceremonies performed on holy days. Mendicant and lay Jains perform different rituals. Some sects worship images – mūrti-pūjaka – and others do not, and different sects have various practices. Focused on images or not, worship can be:
  • external or material – dravya-pūjā – involving offerings of food, drink and precious substances
  • internal or mental – bhava-pūjā – including singing hymns of praise, reciting mantras and meditating.
Nemi
The 22nd Jina of the present age, also called Ariṣṭanemi. His symbolic colour is blue or black and his emblem the conch. There is no historical evidence of his existence. The Jains hold that Nemi is the cousin of the Hindu god Kṛṣna. The tale of his renunciation and jilting of his fiancée Princess Rājīmati are famous among the Jains.
Pārśva
The 23rd Jina of the present age. His symbolic colour is green and his emblem the snake. Historical evidence points to his living around 950 to 850 BC.
Devotee
An enthusiastic follower of a religion. Can also describe a keen enthusiast of an individual, concept or activity.
Idol
An image of a deity or concept that is worshipped either as a god or as a representation of the deity.
Laity
Believers in a religion who are ordinary worshippers, not clergy or members of religious orders. In Jainism, lay people are often called 'householders', indicating that they live in houses and have domestic responsibilities, unlike ascetics.
Rite
A sequence of actions that must be followed to perform a religious ceremony. The set of actions is largely symbolic, for example offering food to statues symbolises sacrificing to a deity. The ritual actions are often accompanied by set phrases.
Temple
A building reserved for public worship or prayer, usually dedicated to one religion and run by members of that religion's clergy.
Sanctuary
The most sacred area of a temple, church or religious building, often where the image of a deity is housed and worshipped. An outdoor space that is associated with a deity may also be considered a sanctuary.
Lotus
A plant noted for its beautiful flowers, which has symbolic significance in many cultures. In Indian culture, the lotus is a water lily signifying spiritual purity and detachment from the material world. Lotuses frequently feature in artwork of Jinas, deities, Buddha and other holy figures.

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