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Browsing: Viveka-vilāsa (Or. 2136 ms. A)

Image: Shelfmark and provenance

Title: Shelfmark and provenance

Source:
The British Library Board
Shelfmark:
Or. 2136 ms. A
Author:
Jinadatta
Date of creation:
15th century
Folio number:
1 recto
Total number of folios:
76
Place of creation:
western India
Language:
Sanskrit
Medium:
paper
Size:
26 x 10.5 cms
Copyright:
CC0 1.0 (Creative Commons Public Domain)
Image copyright: Creative Commons Public Domain

Background

The Vāyaḍa-gaccha author Jinadatta-sūri’s Viveka-vilāsaDelight of Discrimination – belongs to the doxographical genre, a group of works dealing with the teachings of various Indian schools of thought. This characteristic appears in the ninth section of the work, where the six philosophical systems are reviewed and refuted. Even so, the work chiefly focuses on Jain orthodoxy in the areas of religious belief and practice. Matters relating to the ideal life of a Jain lay man are treated in detail, as well as related subjects. The date of the work is uncertain.

There are 12 chapters in the work, which end on the following pages in this manuscript:

 

Chapter endings and equivalent folios

Chapter

Folio number where chapter ends

1

4 recto

2

6 recto

3

7 verso

4

8 recto

5

11 recto

6

12 recto

7

12 recto

8

19 recto

9

19 verso

10

20 recto

11

21 verso

12

21 verso

Glossary

Gaccha
Literally a Sanskrit word for 'tree', gaccha is used by Śvetāmbara Mūrti-pūjak Jains to describe the largest groups of their mendicant lineages. It is often translated as 'monastic group', 'monastic order' or 'monastic tradition'. These groups are formed when some mendicants split from their gaccha because of disagreements over ascetic practices.
Jain
Follower of the 24 Jinas or an adjective describing Jain teachings or practices. The term 'Jaina' is also used although 'Jain' is more common.
Laity
Believers in a religion who are ordinary worshippers, not clergy or members of religious orders. In Jainism, lay people are often called 'householders', indicating that they live in houses and have domestic responsibilities, unlike ascetics.
Jinadatta
(1075–1154) Kharatara-gaccha monk. Later biographers give accounts of his miraculous powers, including raising the dead. He is one of the four Dada-sūris or Dada-gurus – 'granddad gurus' – of the Kharatara-gaccha , who are worshipped in western India.
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